INTRAMUROS
- EMILIO AGUINALD
- MANUEL QUEZON
- SERGIO OSMENA
- JOSE LAUREL 
- MANUEL ROXAS

Recation
I saw this, the posted is idol of persons for pictures are not complete because its empty one of Emilio Aguinaldo. It is allright that is okay.

INTRAMUROS

- EMILIO AGUINALD

- MANUEL QUEZON

- SERGIO OSMENA

- JOSE LAUREL 

- MANUEL ROXAS

Recation

I saw this, the posted is idol of persons for pictures are not complete because its empty one of Emilio Aguinaldo. It is allright that is okay.

INTRAMUROS
MEMORARE - MANILA 1945
This monument is erected in menory of the more than 100,000 killed defenseless civilians who were killed during the battle for the liberation of Manila between February 3 and March 3, 1945 they were hainly victims of heinous acts perpetrated by the Japanese casualtes of the heavy aerillery garrage by the heavy artillery the battle for Manila at the end od world war II was one of the most brutal episode in the history of asia and the pacific, that tragic battle will remain forever in the hearts and minds of the Filipino people.

Reaction
I was inspired this, she helped with one gentleman for got away, she made sad for their family or relationship.

INTRAMUROS

MEMORARE - MANILA 1945

This monument is erected in menory of the more than 100,000 killed defenseless civilians who were killed during the battle for the liberation of Manila between February 3 and March 3, 1945 they were hainly victims of heinous acts perpetrated by the Japanese casualtes of the heavy aerillery garrage by the heavy artillery the battle for Manila at the end od world war II was one of the most brutal episode in the history of asia and the pacific, that tragic battle will remain forever in the hearts and minds of the Filipino people.

Reaction

I was inspired this, she helped with one gentleman for got away, she made sad for their family or relationship.

Intramuros
Intramuros (Latin, “within the walls”) is the oldest district and historic core of the City of Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Also called the Walled City, the original citadel of Manila was the seat of government when the Philippines were a component realm of the Spanish Empire. Districts beyond the walls were referred as the extramuros of Manila, meaning “outside the walls”.

Construction of the defensive walls was started by the Spanish colonial government in the late 16th century to protect the city from foreign invasions. The 0.67-square-kilometre (0.26 sq mi) walled city was originally located along the shores of the Manila Bay, south of the entrance to Pasig River. Guarding the old city is Fort Santiago, its citadel located at the mouth of the river. Land reclamations during the early 20th-century subsequently obscured the walls and fort from the bay.

Intramuros was heavily damaged during the battle to recapture the city from the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War. Reconstruction of the walls was started in 1951 when Intramuros was declared a National Historical Monument, which is continued to this day by the Intramuros Administration (IA).

BALUARTE DE SAN GABRIEL
Built in 1593, this was the Walled City’s most important defense in the north that protected the riverside. Rampart cannons overlooked the Parian in Binondo.

Site of the first Parian in Manila and former site site of the Hostipal de San Gabriel. Hospital founded i 1587 by the Dominican fathers for Chinese populace. Destroyed by fire in 1597. Rebuiding stopped by city government for security reasons. Moved to Binondo. Closed in 1774. 

Balurate de San Gabriel underwent renovations in the 18th century. Destroyed in 1945 during the Battle of Manila. Restored in 1989.
Reference: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intramuros

Reaction
I was here at Intramuros with my friend because I was first time to be here. I admired those history by the walls like rock called a history.

Intramuros

Intramuros (Latin, “within the walls”) is the oldest district and historic core of the City of Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Also called the Walled City, the original citadel of Manila was the seat of government when the Philippines were a component realm of the Spanish Empire. Districts beyond the walls were referred as the extramuros of Manila, meaning “outside the walls”.

Construction of the defensive walls was started by the Spanish colonial government in the late 16th century to protect the city from foreign invasions. The 0.67-square-kilometre (0.26 sq mi) walled city was originally located along the shores of the Manila Bay, south of the entrance to Pasig River. Guarding the old city is Fort Santiago, its citadel located at the mouth of the river. Land reclamations during the early 20th-century subsequently obscured the walls and fort from the bay.

Intramuros was heavily damaged during the battle to recapture the city from the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War. Reconstruction of the walls was started in 1951 when Intramuros was declared a National Historical Monument, which is continued to this day by the Intramuros Administration (IA).

BALUARTE DE SAN GABRIEL

Built in 1593, this was the Walled City’s most important defense in the north that protected the riverside. Rampart cannons overlooked the Parian in Binondo.

Site of the first Parian in Manila and former site site of the Hostipal de San Gabriel. Hospital founded i 1587 by the Dominican fathers for Chinese populace. Destroyed by fire in 1597. Rebuiding stopped by city government for security reasons. Moved to Binondo. Closed in 1774. 

Balurate de San Gabriel underwent renovations in the 18th century. Destroyed in 1945 during the Battle of Manila. Restored in 1989.

Reference: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intramuros

Reaction

I was here at Intramuros with my friend because I was first time to be here. I admired those history by the walls like rock called a history.

INTRAMUROS
Manila Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica ( Manila Cathedral )
The Manila Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica, informally known as the Manila Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic basilica located in Manila, Philippines, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary as Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, the Principal Patroness of the Philippines. The cathedral serves as the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila, Luis Antonio Tagle.

Located at Plaza de Roma in the Intramuros district of Manila, the cathedral was originally a parish church owned and governed by the diocese of Mexico in 1571, until it became a separate diocese on February 6, 1579 upon the issuance of a Papal bull Illius Fulti Praesido by Pope Gregory XIII.

The cathedral was damaged and destroyed several times since the original cathedral was built in 1581. The eighth and current instance of the cathedral was completed in 1958. It officially became the Metropolitan of the country after Philippine independence from the United States.

The basilica has merited three papal endorsements and two apostolic visits from Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Paul VI and Pope John Paul II, who through the papal bull Quod Ipsum declared the cathedral a minor basilica by his own Motu Proprio on April 27, 1981.

History

The cathedral originally started as the Church of Manila and was officially established in 1571 by a secular priest, Padre Juan de Vivero, who arrived in Manila Bay in 1566. De Vivero, the chaplain on the galleon of San Geronimo, was sent by the Archbishop of Mexico, Alonso de Montúfar, to establish Christianity as the spiritual and religious administration in newly colonized Philippines. De Vivero later became the vicar-general and the first ecclesiastical judge of the city of Manila.

Spanish Conquistador Miguel López de Legazpi chose the location of the church and placed it under the patronage of Santa Potenciana. The first parish priest of the church was Padre Juan de Villanueva.

When the church was raised to a cathedral in 1579, a new structure made from nipa, wood and bamboo was constructed in 1581 by Bishop Domingo de Salazar, the first Bishop of Manila. The new structure was consecrated on December 21, 1581, formally becoming a cathedral. The structure was destroyed by fire in 1583, which started during the funeral Mass for Governor-General Gonzalo Ronquillo de Peñalosa in San Agustin Church that razed much of the city.
Reference: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intramuros
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manila_Cathedral

Reaction
It was history of the Cathedral that looked at this old church. It saved the old church for staying in a long time. 

INTRAMUROS

Manila Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica ( Manila Cathedral )

The Manila Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica, informally known as the Manila Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic basilica located in Manila, Philippines, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary as Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, the Principal Patroness of the Philippines. The cathedral serves as the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila, Luis Antonio Tagle.

Located at Plaza de Roma in the Intramuros district of Manila, the cathedral was originally a parish church owned and governed by the diocese of Mexico in 1571, until it became a separate diocese on February 6, 1579 upon the issuance of a Papal bull Illius Fulti Praesido by Pope Gregory XIII.

The cathedral was damaged and destroyed several times since the original cathedral was built in 1581. The eighth and current instance of the cathedral was completed in 1958. It officially became the Metropolitan of the country after Philippine independence from the United States.

The basilica has merited three papal endorsements and two apostolic visits from Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Paul VI and Pope John Paul II, who through the papal bull Quod Ipsum declared the cathedral a minor basilica by his own Motu Proprio on April 27, 1981.

History

The cathedral originally started as the Church of Manila and was officially established in 1571 by a secular priest, Padre Juan de Vivero, who arrived in Manila Bay in 1566. De Vivero, the chaplain on the galleon of San Geronimo, was sent by the Archbishop of Mexico, Alonso de Montúfar, to establish Christianity as the spiritual and religious administration in newly colonized Philippines. De Vivero later became the vicar-general and the first ecclesiastical judge of the city of Manila.

Spanish Conquistador Miguel López de Legazpi chose the location of the church and placed it under the patronage of Santa Potenciana. The first parish priest of the church was Padre Juan de Villanueva.

When the church was raised to a cathedral in 1579, a new structure made from nipa, wood and bamboo was constructed in 1581 by Bishop Domingo de Salazar, the first Bishop of Manila. The new structure was consecrated on December 21, 1581, formally becoming a cathedral. The structure was destroyed by fire in 1583, which started during the funeral Mass for Governor-General Gonzalo Ronquillo de Peñalosa in San Agustin Church that razed much of the city.

Reference: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intramuros

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manila_Cathedral

Reaction

It was history of the Cathedral that looked at this old church. It saved the old church for staying in a long time. 

QUEZON MEMORIAL CIRCLE
MANUEL QUEZON

Manuel Luis Quezón y Molina (August 19, 1878 – August 1, 1944) served as president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines from 1935 to 1944. He was the first Filipino to head a government of the Philippines (as opposed to other historical states), and is considered by most Filipinos to have been the second president of the Philippines, after Emilio Aguinaldo (1897–1901).

Quezón was the first Senate president elected to the presidency, the first president elected through a national election and the first incumbent to secure re-election (for a partial second term, later extended, due to amendments to the 1935 Constitution). He is known as the “Father of the National Language”.

During his presidency, Quezón tackled the problem of landless peasants in the countryside. Other major decisions include reorganization of the islands’ military defense, approval of recommendation for government reorganization, promotion of settlement and development in Mindanao, dealing with the foreign stranglehold on Philippine trade and commerce, proposals for land reform, and opposing graft and corruption within the government. He established an exiled government in the U.S. with the outbreak of the war and the threat of Japanese invasion.

It was during his exile in the U.S. that he died of tuberculosis at Saranac Lake, New York. He was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery until the end of World War II, when his remains was moved to Manila. His final resting place is the Quezon City Memorial Circle.
Reference: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_L._Quezon

Reaction
I saw this wall that gets idol of the persons by the walls. It looked a nice the idol. It was so clearly the idol of the persons by the white walls.

QUEZON MEMORIAL CIRCLE

MANUEL QUEZON

Manuel Luis Quezón y Molina (August 19, 1878 – August 1, 1944) served as president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines from 1935 to 1944. He was the first Filipino to head a government of the Philippines (as opposed to other historical states), and is considered by most Filipinos to have been the second president of the Philippines, after Emilio Aguinaldo (1897–1901).

Quezón was the first Senate president elected to the presidency, the first president elected through a national election and the first incumbent to secure re-election (for a partial second term, later extended, due to amendments to the 1935 Constitution). He is known as the “Father of the National Language”.

During his presidency, Quezón tackled the problem of landless peasants in the countryside. Other major decisions include reorganization of the islands’ military defense, approval of recommendation for government reorganization, promotion of settlement and development in Mindanao, dealing with the foreign stranglehold on Philippine trade and commerce, proposals for land reform, and opposing graft and corruption within the government. He established an exiled government in the U.S. with the outbreak of the war and the threat of Japanese invasion.

It was during his exile in the U.S. that he died of tuberculosis at Saranac Lake, New York. He was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery until the end of World War II, when his remains was moved to Manila. His final resting place is the Quezon City Memorial Circle.

Reference: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_L._Quezon

Reaction

I saw this wall that gets idol of the persons by the walls. It looked a nice the idol. It was so clearly the idol of the persons by the white walls.